Festival Boats 2018

Check in weekly to see who’s coming to this year’s festival! We will be updating frequently and in no particular order. Thank you, and see you soon!

See 2017’s boats here
Sort By Boat Name
  • Ariel of Victoria
    Year Built: 1980
    LOA: 58'
    Beam: 13'6"
    Owner: Christine Scoggins Granquist
    Designer: Fred Peterson
    Design: One-off
    Type: Ketch

    Ariel of Victoria’s keel was laid in Fred Peterson’s boatyard on Vancouver Island near Nanaimo in 1972. Carvel planked in Alaskan yellow cedar over oak frames with a western red cedar deck, she was launched in 1980 after “seven years of madness” by Ronald Hunt and Peterson. Doug & Jane Bond bought her in Victoria and raised two sons aboard, sailing her in the Salish Sea and participating in the local racing community. In 2009, Jane sold Ariel to Christy Granquist who, with Daniel Joram, brought the boat to Seattle and began a hull & systems restoration/renovation project (planking, frames, transom and aft cabin, electrical, water, sewage). In 2012, another renovation push involved a new galley, engine rebuild, fuel & exhaust systems. And in 2015, she was hauled out for 18 months to rebuild her decks and main cabin, re-cork, fair, install new steering & nav systems.

    In between all the projects Ariel of Victoria sails extensively, covering 5000 miles in the Salish Sea between 2010 & 2015, and racing in several local events. We are looking forward to taking her further in the coming seasons.

  • Betsy D
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 1977
    LOA: 35' 6"
    Beam: 6' 6"
    Owner: Jake Beattie & Jean Scarboro
    Designer: Traditional
    Design: New Haven Sharpie
    Type: Ketch

    Built in Anacortes in 1977 (same year as the first Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival) by a 20 year old aspiring boat builder named Bo Garrison who took the lines from Chappelles American Small Craft. The boat’s design is an evolution from dugout canoes, and came into service for watermen in Long Island Sound for ease of construction, speed, ease of handling, and shoal draft- which made it ideal for tonging for oysters.

    The rig is consists of two solid, unstayed spars, with sprit-booms that are tensioned with “snotter lines” against lashings on the mast. Oddly, the sails reef vertically; the snotter lines are eased and the luff of the sail is gathered at the mast. Honestly, it’s a pretty bad system since you have to strike the sail, tie every reef point as you re-raise it, and what you are left with is a bunched up sail as the leading edge of your sail. Eventually we’re going to get around to changing that.

    A modern adaptation of that hull form, the Betsy D was originally named Transit and had a full cabin, and the builder cruised it extensively in the Salish Sea, making it as far north as Desolation Sound. In 1983 it was donated to Seattle’s Center for Wooden Boats where it was a long serving member of the fleet, primarily as the public sail vessel; every Sunday it would take people sailing in Lake Union free of charge. The current owners, Jake Beattie and Jean Scarboro, fell in love with the boat while employees there, and when they heard it was being surplussed jumped at the chance to be its caretakers. They traded a Port Madison pram for the boat and set in on a year long restoration. They both now live in Port Townsend and camp cruise it with their daughter in the summers.

  • Bibi
    Year Built: 1964
    LOA: 16' 6"
    Beam: 6' 2"
    Owner: Kristopher Hicks-Green
    Designer: Ludvik "Louie" Piotr Zbigniewicz
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sloop

    Bibi is a hard-chined, plywood centerboard sloop built in 1964 by hobbyist Ludvik Zbigniewicz, apparently to his own design. She has a long, fine entry, considerable rocker, and a tiny, distinctively squared-off cuddy with a small porthole on either side. BIBI is bronze fastened and heavily framed for her size—a reflection of both the conservative approach taken by builders experimenting with plywood in its relatively early days, and also of the fierce prairie winds and steep chop on Lake Winnipeg, for which the builder designed her.

    Her prior owner, Jack Mathias of Nanaimo BC, owned her from 1997 until 2017, and relayed this history. “She was built…for sailing solo on Lake Winnipeg … If you don’t know that lake, it’s roughly 400 km long, north to south, 100 km wide, and averages only 12 m deep. With that length of wind fetch, flat surrounding countryside and shallow depth, the lake can get extremely rough. That’s why the vessel is built so strongly, comes with a canvas storm jib and a drogue, has extra fore and aft flotation, and has the roller boom for reefing the mainsail. I suspect the small thermometer and barometer mounted in the forward bulkhead of the cabin is to watch for squalls and thunderstorms, for which the prairies are famous.”

    The builder’s daughter confirmed that Mr. Zbigniewicz built BIBI. “As a matter of fact”, she wrote, “he built several and this one was the largest, built when the new baby was born, to accommodate his growing family. I’m that baby.”

    Zbigniewicz was born in 1918 in Warsaw, Poland. He enrolled in the Sea Cadets and sailed tall ships in the Baltic. He enlisted in 1939 and served in the Polish army before being captured by the Germans and imprisoned for the duration of World War II. After being liberated, he rejoined Polish troops in Italy and eventually emigrated to Manitoba, where he worked variously as a farm hand, lumberjack, for a gas company, and as a business owner. In addition to woodworking, Zbigniewicz also enjoyed working in metals, and he cast or machined all of the metal fittings on BIBI. He passed away in 1997.
    With only three owners from new, BIBI remains remarkably original and is a proper little yacht.

  • Black Opal
    Year Built: 1973
    LOA: 41'
    Beam: 12'6"
    Owner: Jerry Norman
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Classic 36
    Type: Power

    Black Opal is a Classic Grand Banks 36 Trawler. This boat was purchased and totally redone by it’s previous owners Jim and Barbara Thiele. They enjoyed her for many years and kept her under cover at Pleasant Harbor. She has cruised to Alaska. Currently she is kept under cover at La Conner Marina and we enjoy cruising her in the San Juan Island.

  • Blossom
    Year Built: 1938
    LOA: 28'6"
    Beam: 7'10"
    Owner: Erica Georgaklis
    Designer: Ed. Monk Sr
    Design: Unknown
    Type: Sloop

    Blossom was built in 1938 in Tacoma, WA by the Anderson yard. Several similar sloops of Ed. Monk’s designs were being constructed in the late 30’s and early 40’s including S/V Sea Witch. She is heavily constructed of yellow cedar planks on white oak frames with a Douglas fir backbone and iron ballast.

    Much of her history before 2000 is unknown to the current owner, but she was very well kept for a long time – much of her structure appears original. In the mid 2010’s she was in Sam Devlin’s yard and received a new ply deck, was refastened below the waterline, had most of her butt blocks below the waterline scarfed out, an aluminum deck stepped rig, and 2003 Yanmar 2GM20. In 2016-17 her mast step and surrounding floors were replaced, as were many of the surrounding frames.

    Blossom has explored extensively in the San Juan’s but not much further. With a long way to go in her restoration, Blossom’s owner hopes to soon explore the Gulf Islands, and further north. Come see Blossom and help us celebrate her 80th birthday!

  • Bout
    Year Built: 1939
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 8'7"
    Owner: Oliver and Janice Pedersen
    Designer: M.S.J. Hansen
    Design: 38 Square Meter Spidsgatter
    Type: Sloop

    This 38 square meter sloop designed by Marius Sofus Joannes Hansen in November, 1935, was built by Thomsen Boatyard in Kalundborg, Denmark and launched in 1939.

    Bout has undergone a complete, loving, restoration beginning in September 2017 by Robert D’Arcy and Douglas Jones, and their professional crew, Jason, Riley, Jen, and Zolly. All work was done inside the Port Townsend Maritime Building. Her construction is plank on frame using white oak framing, larch planks, and teak decks over angelique framing. The center line is purple heart.Her cabin is original with a new interior. Doug Jones reshaped the mast, and Port Townsend Foundry created all the bronze works. Sails were made by Carol Hasse, and rigging by Port Townsend Rigging. Brian Toss contributed as well. Walt Tisdale handled the new engine installation. Bout was able to hold onto her lead keel during WWII when Nazi Germany occupied Denmark. In 1966, she was solo sailed from San Diego to Hawaii and back by then owner Robert Sisler. Bout was purchased by Ollie and Janice Pedersen in 2006. Photo by Neil Rabinowitz

  • Ceridwen
    Year Built: 1993
    LOA: 40'
    Beam:
    Owner: Matthew McCleary
    Designer: Atkins
    Design: LIttle maid of kent
    Type: Schooner

    Ceridwen was lofted in the fall of 1982 at Magner and Sons Boatworks by John and Kevin Magner and Matt McCleary. Matt continued on with the building project along with his wife Stephanie. Ceridwen has a lead keel and steam bent oak frames. Ceridwen was launched in 1994 in Port Angeles, Washington and made her maiden voyage in 1996 to her home in Port Hadlock. Ceridwen was recently featured in Wooden Boat Magazine in January 2017.

  • Chesuki
    Year Built: 1986
    LOA: 18'
    Beam: 5' 8"
    Owner: David Smith
    Designer: Charles Mower
    Design: Massachusetts Racing Dory
    Type: Sloop

    Using only the lines drawing from the Dori book we measured and created a sheet of offsets to loft her. Thanks to the Newport Marine science center loft and bandsaw, I was able to fully loft her and then create her sawn frames in 1983. Thanks to Dick Tucker in Langlois Oregon I was able to order perfect Port Orford cedar for plankIng. Jamestown distributors was the only mail order supply company back then for Marine supplies (and linguica sausage)!! Coincidentally Silva Bans was being built in a nearby barn at the same time so had to have her!! The schooner Rueben de Cloux was just launched and sailed in Yaquina Bay to our delight and inspiration! Launched as an open row boat I explored the eirie Pools slough where another recluse boatbuilder was creating a wooden sailing masterpiece deep in the woods.

  • Cito
    Year Built: 1936
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 8'8"
    Owner: Cito
    Designer: MSJ Hansen
    Design: 38 M2 Danish class Spidsgatter
    Type: Sloop

    Cito is a Fractionally rigged 1935 Danish 38 M2 Class Spidsgatter sloop designed by MSJ Hansen, built in Copenhagen Denmark in 1936 by Jorgen Wass. Brought to Vancouver Canada in 1955 with some of her sister 38 m2 Spidsgatters. She came to Port Townsend in the fall of 2002, and we bought her in the fall of 2005. A full 8 year restoration was completed in fall of 2013. Restored hull, decks, cockpit, interior. All new spars, standing and running rigging, along with sails, and all marine canvas by Northwest Sails and Canvas.

    Cito is our cabin on the water, and she takes us cruising up into the vast realms of the Salish Sea annually. She is a pleasure to sail and voyage in, comfortable and compact.

  • Deluge
    Year Built: 2018
    LOA: 30'
    Beam:
    Owner: Fred Rowley
    Designer: Graham Byrnes
    Design: Core Sound 17 mk3
    Type: Cat ketch

    The Core Sound 17 mk3 represents the evolution of a design that has proven its seaworthiness and performance time and again in the Everglades Challenge and other race events around the country. We built Deluge because it’s readily trailerable with a small family car, reasonably quick to launch, fun to sail, and a very capable, seaworthy craft on the water. The design includes water ballast tanks which, when the seas get rough, add over 300 pounds of ballast. The cozy cabin sleeps 2 with tons of storage space for extended trips.

  • Duke
    Year Built: 1947
    LOA: 47'
    Beam: 13' 5"
    Owner: Ryan Downs
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    Duke was built in 1947 in Tacoma, WA by Cummings Boat Company. She is Douglass Fir on steam bent oak frames. Like many trollers of her era, she is powered by a Detroit Diesel 6-71 engine. After she was built, she fished out of Sitka, AK and soon after moved to Eureka, CA. On opening day, 1955, her first season as a crabber, she set the record that year: 7,000 lbs! SHe went through 2 owners in Eureka before moving to Port Townsend in the late 1990s, owned by Prentiss and Heidi Bloedel, who converted her to a cruiser. Duke was then owned by Curtis Schloe, who lovingly maintained her. Ryan Downs bought Duke in 2015, and is continuing to care for the ship. The vessel will head back to Alaska next summer to take passengers on weeklong trips out of Petersburg.

  • El Mistico
    Year Built: 1927
    LOA: 44'7"
    Beam: 10'6"
    Owner: James Poirson
    Designer: Theorel and Nordstrom
    Design: Bridge Deck Cruiser
    Type: Power

    . A number of such installations have been made on the West Coast and are being watched with keen interest by motor boat operators everywhere.

    A particularly striking yacht installation was that made in the 44-foot power cruiser El Mistico owned by E. Michelson of the Seattle Yacht Club. The El Mistico was built by the Ballard Marine Railway of Seattle from designs by Thearle and Nordstrom and embodies a number of striking features in design, construction, and arrangement.

    The power plant is one of the new four-cylinder Fairbanks-Morse marine Diesel engines developing 40 h.p. at 650 r.p.m. This engine is of the two-cycle type. The installation was made under the personal supervision of A. F. Whitehead, manager of the service department of the Seattle branch of Fairbanks-Morse & Company.

    A feature of the job is the special unit control stand designed by Fairbanks-Morse engineers, and due to the success of the El Mistico will be made standard on this type of craft. By the use of this control, which is in a single bronze casting, the engine can be started, the clutch manipulated, the speed regulated and the reverse operated by the man at the wheel. Air and oil pressures are carried to the pilot house so that the owner can at all times follow the operating conditions of the engine. There is a thermostatic monometer for indicating engine temperature.

    …The centralization of controls enables one man to operate the boat readily.

  • Ellida
    Year Built: 1930
    LOA: 30'7"
    Beam: 10'1"
    Owner: Arley Brock
    Designer: Doug Krampitz
    Design: Dog Star
    Type: Cutter rig

    The Ellida is a Double ended, cutter rig that is a work of art and a thing of beauty. She glides through the water either under sail or powered by her 30 horse powered Westerbeke diesel engine.

  • Endangered Species
    Year Built: 1997
    LOA: 10'2"
    Beam: 7'
    Owner: Todd Feinroth
    Designer: John Guzzwell
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sloop

    Endangered Species is a custom cold molded race boat specifically designed and built to compete in the Single Handed Transpac race. She was designed and built by northwest iconic boat builder/sailor John Guzzwell.

  • Fable
    Year Built: 1976
    LOA: 20'
    Beam: 8'4"
    Owner: Baila Dworsky
    Designer: Chapelle
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sloop

    The “Fable” originated as a Cat Boat Spritzel Rigged Ketch inspired by a Chapelle catboat hull design. Original builders were David Acorn and Bruce Tipton. Unfinished, she left Port Townsend to sail in Nehalem Bay, Oregon. Rig redesigned by Carl Chamberlain and brought back to Port Townsend to be completed by a host of amazing boat builders including those at Baird Boat, Freja Boatworks, and the owner, Baila, and many fine friends.

  • Fire-Drake
    Year Built: 2016
    LOA: 18'
    Beam: 5'4"
    Owner: Alex Zimmerman
    Designer: Alex Zimmerman
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sail and oar Lug yawl

    Fire-Drake was designed and built to cruise the Salish Sea and traverse the Inside Passage, using only wind and muscle power in alignment with the classic sail and oar ethic. She incorporates lessons from decades of kayaking, and refinements from cruising with a previous sail and oar boat. Her combination of beam, hull form and sheer provide balance between the ability to carry sail in rough water and the capability to row for entire windless days. Her rig can be set up or struck in under two minutes for the many transitions between sailing and rowing forced by the variable summertime conditions found on this coast. She can carry two months of supplies in her watertight buoyancy compartments and she is arranged for sleeping aboard at anchor under her custom cockpit tent. Fire-Drake’s mission was to affordably deliver adventure through self-reliance, and she has done that.

  • Flying Eagle
    Year Built: 1963
    LOA: 33'6"
    Beam: 9'6"
    Owner: Rick Strollo
    Designer: Vinal Beal
    Design: Maine lobster boat
    Type: Power

    “FLYING EAGLE” as named by lobsterman Floyd Pinkham of Gouldsboro, ME in 1963, was designed & built by Vinal Beal. All such lobster boats were constructed by Vinal during the winter when not lobstering, by means of a half-model (no plans). These stunning vessels with their low freeboard & graceful sheer are often referred to as a “Beals Islander” or “Jonesporter”.., a work boat with beauty of purpose & specifically built for their own geographic down east Maine fishing conditions. Without question, these watercraft were the most beautiful & fastest vessels of their time. Their speed (23+ knots) were a direct result of their “skeg construction”. Skeg designs were constructed with the frames (or hull bottom) joining the keel in a flat plane nearly perpendicular to the sides of the keel, so the bottom planking at the after part of the hull meets the skeg (keel) almost at right angles. In turn, they were often lighter & faster than their “built-down” construction counterparts in Southern or mid-coast Maine. Simply put, Vinal’s design had less holding the hull back with a very flat run aft, less wetted surface & a prop less obstructed. They were also known to be stronger where the horn timber, keel & stern post come together, were less rolly while working adrift & more stable carrying large loads. She’s a rare breed with a rich documented history of hunting Maine lobsters for an astonishing 45+ years & a rare find because most were left to rot with the advent of fiberglass. When more powerful engines & mechanized means of hauling traps became common, their graceful shearlines & low freeboard soon vanished.

    Discovered in Rockport Maine late 2014, FLYING EAGLE, as promptly re-named (as original when her keel was laid in 1962), was partially refit indoors at ARTISAN BOATWORKS during the worst of heavy winter weather. By spring she then endured an eleven day, 3,500 mile overland journey by flatbed truck to Anacortes Washington, arriving May 1, 2014. Following two active cruising seasons between Port Townsend, Canada & the San Juan Islands, she then completed final structural restorations during the first six months of 2017 at EMERALD MARINE in Anacortes, WA. During the restoration process, the focus has always been preserving what once was & what will never be again, so generations to come will have the opportunity to appreciate her. FLYING EAGLE would not be here today if not for all past owners (mostly lobstermen) over the last 55 years, each of which have done their part with repair & maintenance while working her hard in the far eastern fetches of the Maine.

    NOTE: Other than a lighter 2013, 383 Mercruiser gas V8 stroker engine, FLYING EAGLE is very much original including her Newport Green, Medium Buff & White color scheme, her throaty dry-stack exhaust rising up through her standing shelter & her underwater bronze prop-cage meant to prevent fowling. She still does 23 knots!

  • FOTO
    Year Built: 2006
    LOA: 17'6"
    Beam:
    Owner: Marty Loken
    Designer: Weston Farmer
    Design: Sundance
    Type: Power

    FOTO, the official Photo Boat of Small Craft Advisor magazine (published in Port Townsend), was restored by owner Marty Loken. The boat was built to a Weston Farmer design in 2006 by Marty’s friend Bob Petersen of Ocean Park, WA, the retired harbormaster at Ilwaco. Raised-deck outboard cruisers like FOTO were first designed by Weston Farmer in 1928; he continued to draw variations on the theme until 1953, when this design, dubbed Sundance, was published in Motor Boating magazine. Since its restoration earlier this year, FOTO has helped capture images of the Seventy48 human-powered race from Tacoma to Port Townsend, along with photos of many smaller sailboats to be featured in Small Craft Advisor, including Mathieu Bonnier’s LITEBOAT XP, which competed in this year’s Race to Alaska, and SKATE, a fast 15-footer designed and built by Brandon Davis of Turn Point Design in Port Townsend. Marty and his wife, Mo Moss, also enjoy using FOTO for crabbing and camp-cruising adventures in Puget Sound waters.

  • Francis Lee
    Year Built: 2010-2014
    LOA: 61' 11"
    Beam: 9' 10"
    Owner: Kim & Susan Bottles
    Designer: Robert H. Perry
    Design: Perry Sliver
    Type: Sloop

    Designed by Bob Perry and built by the students and staff of the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding FRANCIS LEE is a Perry Sliver Class Daysailer designed and built for the pure joy of sailing. Her construction was supervised by Bruce Blatchley the contemporary instructor at the school. She has modest yet comfortable accommodations and has been cruised by a couple for up to two weeks at a time in the Salish Sea.

    She was engineered by Tim Nolan and modeled by Jim Franken. CNC work was by Turn Point Design. Custom metal work was done by Bill Campbell. Lamination consulting and direction was done by Russell Brown. Final fitting out was done at CSR Marine in Ballard, WA. Her sails are by Schattauer Sails in Ballard, WA. She has a carbon fiber rig and rudder. Her deck, cockpit and cabin along with interior structure is all foam core composite yielding a light but very strong build. Her Hull is strip planked Western Red Cedar with a clear Douglas Fir backbone and clamp. Her Hull is sheathed inside and out with West System Epoxy set in VectorPly. A one off custom design, she has turned out to be very fast but with very mild manners. She has been featured in a number of magazine articles and a two part video in OffCenterHarbor.com.

  • FREEDOM
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 1938
    LOA: 51'
    Beam: 11'
    Owner: Todd Feinroth
    Designer: John G. Alden
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sloop

    FREEDOM is a historically significant John Alden design, Herreshoff build, round bilge full keel, flush deck, auxiliary cutter with a stub bowsprit.

    History Note: This is a 1937 John G. Alden design No. 676 built for William P. Barrows by the Herreshoff Manufacturing Company, Bristol, RI. Freedom was launched on June 15, 1938, just 2 weeks after the death of Capn Nat. FREEDOM is hull No. 1431 with the original builders commissioning tag affixed in the cockpit.

    Construction – Carvel single Phillipine mahogany 1 ¼ inch thickness wide planking – White oak frames to 10 in centres – Everdur bronze fastenings, 3 per plank to frame – Bronze hanging knees – Bronze hull, deck, cabin and frame strapping – Original bronze angle straps reinforce frames by way of the mast step – Teak single deck planking over 1 ¾ x 1 ¼ inch beams at 10 inch centres – Honduras mahogany trunk cabin and trim – Wood blade rudder – Bronze keel bolts Accommodation and Domestic Equipment – Berths for 6 with nav station, galley and head.

    FREEDOM was the last Pre-WWII ocean racing yacht built by the HMC. FREEDOM was first overall in the 1966 Newport-Ensenada race where she beat out over 500 boats. She has also won dozens of races in the southern California region over the last several decades. Currently FREEDOM is based in Port Townsend where she is continuing her restoration to be in As-Built” condition. Once restored in PT she will be campaigned around the world competing in classic yacht regattas in Washington State, Newport RI, Maine and on the Med circuits.

  • Glencannon
    Year Built: 1974
    LOA: 26'
    Beam: 8'
    Owner: Bo Neill
    Designer: George Calkins
    Design: 26ft Bartender Sportfisher
    Type: Power

    Artenders are known throughout the PNW and other regions of the world with rough waters for their able sea keeping abilities. I spent 8 years converting Glencannon from a rough and ready fish boat to a sweet and able little pocket cruiser. She just as happy on the rough river bars of the Oregon Coast as cruising on the Canadian and American waters of the Salish Sea. The last 2 years of the restoration were spent in in the Schooner Martha shop under the watchful eye of Robertd’Arcy, Doug Jones and their able crew.

  • Gooselodge II
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 2003
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 8'8"
    Owner: Sam Devlin
    Designer: Sam Devlin
    Design: Surf Runner 25
    Type: Power

    Gooselodge II is a Devlin Surf Runner 25 design, built in 2003 with The Stitch and Glue Method of construction. She has a 160hp diesel sterndrive engine and runs at a top speed of 26knots and an economical cruise speed of 18 knots burning about 4 gallons of fuel per hour. She runs quiet and smoothly thru the water and is a joy on a warm summer day. Sam Devlin and his wife Soitza were married on her in 2006 standing on her stern engine box lid barefoot on a warm August day.

  • Gracious Lady
    Year Built: 1951
    LOA: 50'
    Beam: 16'6"
    Owner: John Hale
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Promonade
    Type: Power

    The Wheeler Shipyard Corporation was founded in 1910 by Howard E. Wheeler Sr. in Brooklyn, New York. The rest, as they say, is history. Wheeler thrived by building beautiful, highly-regarded yachts with inherent value. As their reputation grew so did their line of quality yachts, the largest design stretching to 85 feet. By 1921 Wheeler Shipyard needed more room, so in 1941 the company purchased an additional 21 acres at Whitestone, Long Island. From here Wheeler produced a fleet of ships for the Navy and Coast Guard to help defend America during World War II.

    At the height of the company’s production more than 6,000 employees worked at the yard, including Mr. Wheeler and his five sons. The shipyard was even equipped with a stage and grandstand with space for several thousand people for entertainment and boat launches. Wheeler built over 3,500 hulls during the 50 years that Wheeler Shipyard Corporation was in production. Among many of these were sea-skiffs, motor cruisers and custom yachts. Wheeler built what is considered to be the most famous fishing boat of all time, Ernest Hemingway’s 38-foot ‘Pilar’, in 1934. This is the boat from which he wrote “The Old Man and the Sea” and “Islands in the Stream.”

    The Gracious Lady was christened the Gallant Lady when she was first built. As she has aged, we believe that she is more gracious that gallant. She was built in the main factory in New York and has sailed the Southern Route around to her current home in Port Angeles, Washington. The Gracious lady has a grand salon, 2 state rooms, 2 bathrooms, galley and crew quarters. Although she has been modernized, she still retains the dignity and elegance of the period in which she was built.”

  • Haida
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 1965
    LOA: 39'11"
    Beam: 10
    Owner: Mark Smaalders
    Designer: Sparkman and Stephens
    Design: S&S 40
    Type: Sloop

    Haida was designed by Sparkman and Stephens as the S&S 40 (Design #1738), and built in Japan by Far East Yachts in 1965. She has a cutaway keel with attached rudder, long overhangs , and moderate beam. She handles beautifully, with a well-balanced helm in all winds.

    Haida was sailed in the Puget Sound in the late 1960s, and raced successfully in local PHRF races (some of the award plaques she won then are still aboard). At some point she made her way to California; the family that owned her made a voyage to Mexico, Hawaii and back to California. In about 1980 she was sailed north to Port Townsend, and remained there until 2013. She has been in the San Juan Islands since 2013.

    Haida is in very good condition, particularly for a boat that is over 50 years old. She has had extensive repairs over the years, with all work done by professional shipwrights with a view to ensuring Haida’s longevity. Her hull is double planked mahogany over Japanese oak (Keyaki) frames. Her stem, horntimber and keelson are a rot-resistant tropical hardwood (Yacal). Extensive work has been done over the past 20+ years. The work was started by Baird Boat Co. in the early 1990s and continued by Bill Eppick of Skye Boat Works (both in Port Townsend). There are extensive written descriptions and photos detailing the work that has been done on Haida. As built, she had galvanized iron floors; these are now ironbark and bronze. Her original galvanized mast step is now a bronze weldment. Her original steel engine bearers are now bronze. Her ballast is lead and attached to the floors with bronze bolts. Fasteners are copper rivets (thousands of them) connecting the two plank layers, and the planks and frames. Floors and frames are joined by bronze bolts. The deck and cabin top were constructed of mahogany plywood, covered by fiberglass and polyester resin. These have largely been replaced by meranti marine plywood with epoxy and cloth. She has received new Honduras Mahogany toe rails and cockpit coamings, and new bronze ports.

    She carries her original Sitka Spruce mast and boom, and when not sailing is powered by a 30 hp Yanmar diesel.

    Haida is now reluctantly for sale. Full details are available at https://sites.google.com/view/haida/

  • Havhesten
    Year Built: 1945
    LOA: 19'
    Beam: 5'3"
    Owner: Sean & Inger Rankins
    Designer: Norwegian
    Design: Langend Sailing Sjekte
    Type: Sloop

    Havhesten (“Seahorse”) was built in Langesund Norway. Her construction began before WWII but was halted soon after it started. Her construction was completed just after the end of the war. She is known in her native waters of Langesund on the southeast coast of Norway as a Langesund Sailing Sjekte (Skiff). Her type of keelboat evolved on the local fjord over many years. Each boat shop… of which there were many… built their own boat to agreed measurements to race against each other. Her construction is oak sawn frames on a oak keelson with Norwegian Red Pitchine Lapstrake planking. Teak decks and furniture. Spruce spars. All fasteners are copper rivets and bronze screws and bolts. Lead ballast. She carries a mainsail with, when the bowsprit is deployed, two headsails and a asymmetrical spinnaker.

    We bought her in 1990 and brought her back with us when we moved back to Port Townsend. She was restored here.

  • Heather
    Year Built: 1937
    LOA: 37'
    Beam: 8' 10"
    Owner: Rowan Stewart
    Designer: Bailey
    Design: One-off
    Type: Cutter

    Heather is a fine example of the New Zealand boat building tradition. She is planked with Kauri, on Australian gum frames, two resilient woods which have stood the test of time. In the mid 1960’s she completed a single handed circumnavigation. She came to Port Townsend in the late 1970’s, and has been in Puget Sound since then. Father and Son Jack and Rowan Stewart are Heather’s current owners/caretakers. From May 2015-2016 she underwent a minor restoration, on the hard on Vashon Island. sections of toe rail, and coverboard were replaced, as well as several deck planks, and a rebuild of the Sternpost. for the past three years she has served as a summer time live-aboard for Rowan, who has day sailed and cruised around the Salish Sea.

  • Hiyu
    Year Built: 2011
    LOA: 10'6"
    Beam:
    Owner: Clayton Wright
    Designer: Harry Bryan
    Design: Fiddlehead
    Type: pedal propeller

    Hiyu is a 10’6” version of Harry Bryan’s Fiddlehead design, referred to as a “decked canoe.” Okoume plywood was used throughout the construction. The designer intended the boat to be paddled like a kayak. The builder developed the pedal drive utilizing a 10” primary pulley and two idler pulleys to redirect the v-belt to the bottom of the boat. The belt twists from vertical to horizontal as it approaches a 2” secondary pulley. Final drive is through an old outboard motor gearbox, turned backwards so the original propeller shaft is receiving the input, and vice-versa, in order to step up the propeller speed. The drive ratio is 1:11, so 50 rpm pedal speed produces 550 rpm at the propeller which delivers about 6 knots. Reverse is accomplished by pedaling backwards. The boat is steered using a joystick which turns the rudder via drag link and bellcrank. The name Hiyu comes from the Chinook jargon and means “plenty, much, lots of something.” Hiyu is a joy to knock around in and runs just like an inboard motorboat, without the stink and noise. She has all the bad features as well, such as she can’t be beached, can’t turn in reverse and the mere sight of weeds fouls the prop.

  • Ibis
    Year Built: 1988
    LOA: 27'
    Beam: 8' 6"
    Owner: Tim Carman
    Designer: Sam Devlin
    Design: Black Crown
    Type: Power

    Ibis is a 27′ Devlin Black Crown sedan trawler. Built in 1988 by Devlin Designing Boatworks using the stitch and glue method and displacing 7050# loaded, she is a perfect Northwest cruiser for two. She is powered by a 44HP Yanmar diesel and cruises at 8kts. Home ported in a boathouse at Portland Yacht Club, we trailer North twice a year.

  • Indian
    Year Built: 1992
    LOA: 38'7"
    Beam: 11'5"
    Owner: Samuel Fry
    Designer: William Garden
    Design: Cutter Rig Sailboat
    Type: Cutter

    Beautifully built and maintained William Garden design Cutter; Built on Bainbridge Island by Andy Goodwin; bright mast, boom, wood decks, bright trim with some contrasting painted cabins, nice wood interior. Purchased by Sam & Pam Fry 2017

  • Island Spirit
    Year Built: 2000
    LOA: 23'
    Beam: 7'10"
    Owner: Jim Griffing
    Designer: Devlin
    Design: Surf Scoter
    Type: Power

    22′ Surf Scoter designed by Sam Devlin and built by Jim Griffing. This is the outboard in a motor well powered semi-displacement version of the Surf Scoter. Construction began in late 1994 in the owners garage. Island Spirit was completed and launched in 2000. In early 2018 she had a bow rail added and had her hull and decks repainted by the crew at Devlin Boats. Owners Jim and Denise Griffing have cruised the boat from Olympia to Port McNeil.

  • Josephine
    Year Built: 1934
    LOA: 37'
    Beam: 9'
    Owner: Sam Devlin
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    A retired Salmon Troller converted commercial fishing boat celebrating her 84th year in fine fittle. A John Deere diesel is in her bowels and she makes a fine character platform and cruising pal for her owners. Sam Devlin, his crew and friends have done a long rebuilding of Josephine in way of converting her from fishing vessel to power cruiser in the last 20 years. It is for sure that her original builders didn’t think she would still be around 84 years after she first touched water, but it’s easy to see her grace on the waters she floats in and it is a testament to her integrity of construction and intent of purpose that has inspired her owners to keep her in such good condition.

  • Joshua
    Year Built: 1979-1982
    LOA: 55'
    Beam: 14' 9"
    Owner: Bill Harpster
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Unknown
    Type: Yawl

    Joshua was launched in 1980 in East Bay in California, with maiden sail in 1982 in San Francisco Bay. In 1996, Harpster and crew sailed to new home in Washington state and currently calls Oak Harbor Marina home. For many years, Harpster has sailed Canadian and Alaskan waters every May through September. This allows him to combine boat maintenance with pleasure and visits to many friends throughout this great area.

  • Kotimana
    Year Built: 2018
    LOA: 25'10"
    Beam: 6'
    Owner: Kere Kemp
    Designer: B.B. Crowninshield
    Design: Dark Harbor 17 1/2
    Type: Sloop

    This Dark Harbor 17 1/2 was built by the Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building Large Craft Classes of 2017 and 2018.

  • Lady Dianne
    Year Built: 1966
    LOA: 52' 1"
    Beam: 14' 5"
    Owner: Lee & Lisa Hoffman
    Designer: Monk Sr
    Design: Coho
    Type: Power

    Alaskan Yellow Cedar and Western Red Cedar over White Oak frames. Construction began in 1966 at McQueen Boat Works in Vancouver, BC. The hull was completed and shipped overland to the Toronto Shipyards where the vessel was completed in 1969. During the completion in Toronto Mr. Edwin Monk Sr. stayed in contact as a consultant. The Carvel planks were miter cut with a cedar strip glued in then faired to smooth finish. The hull was built as a 48 footer and measures 52 feet overall when including overhangs and stern platform.

  • Lauren Nadine
    Year Built: 1969
    LOA: 39' 5"
    Beam: 12' 2"
    Owner: Michael Forsythe
    Designer: Ken Smith
    Design: Grand Banks classic
    Type: Power

    My wife and I purchased Lauren Nadine, formerly Walkabout, just over 1 1/2 years ago. Or as we often put it, we rescued her! After dreaming of owning a Grand Banks for 15 years we took a chance on what appeared to be one of those “too good to be true” tales. She was in a state of neglect and seemed doomed to be a cheap live-aboard option for those not knowledgeable of how great her heritage was. She was a fish out of water in sunny San Diego, surrounded by high speed plastic fishing sedan cruisers and luxury yachts. We spent a night aboard her during our survey (longer story yet!), got to know her more intimately and decided the next day to bring her to the PNW. She is a labor of love as we continue to work to fully restore her to her former glory. We also call her home and absolutely love life aboard with all its adventures, journeys, close community and sunsets! Built in the original factory in Hong Kong’s Junk bay, she has mahogany hulls and teak decks and finishes throughout. She also has the unique quality of being hull #36-100 and we believe that just makes her that much more special. While we currently enjoy cruising the Puget Sound and San Juan islands, we plan to take her much further once her restoration is complete.

  • Laurie T
    Year Built: 1959
    LOA: 34'
    Beam: 10'6"
    Owner: Kemp Jones
    Designer: William Garden
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    Laurie T is Bill Garden’s 1955 design #280. Launched in 1960, she was built in Pete Teller’s Seattle back yard and named for his wife. Still nearly original, with Chrysler Crown and Neptune 1-A stove, she cruises the PNW extensively and lands many a seafood dinner in her cockpit. Construction is yellow cedar over oak, on a massive fir keel. The few upgrades include Furuno chart plotter,sounder,radar, hydrolic steering and autoilot, making Laurie a functionly modern boat if you are ok with a single screw boat without thrusters.

  • Lil' B
    Year Built: 2014
    LOA: 11'
    Beam:
    Owner: Ashlyn Brown
    Designer: Russell Brown
    Design: PT Eleven
    Type: Row

    Designed and built by Russell Brown, the PT Eleven is a highly developed 11ft nesting dinghy ideal for cruising boats since she can be stored in a small space; only 6ft x 4ft 2″. The PT 11 rows very well and has a simple and lightweight, high performance sailing option. Each hull half weighs about 45# and can be assembled in 15 seconds, in the water or out. The PT11 is a rugged and handsome dinghy that takes full advantage of modern CNC technology and carbon composites for hardware & sailing rig. Sold as a high quality and carefully thought out kit. The website, PTWATERCRAFT.COM shows all three boat kits from Port Townsend Watercraft, with information, photos, and videos.

  • Lugus
    Year Built: 1999
    LOA: 25' 8"
    Beam: 7' 6"
    Owner: Brad Seamans
    Designer: Ed Louchard
    Design: Truant
    Type: Gaff rig Sloop

    This boat completed a major centerline rebuild in 2011. The open cockpit sports a removable cabin, that makes it more of a camp cruiser. The Gaff rigged sails, and traditional rigging give it a classic look. This sturdy little boat has seen some big seas! We spent a week sailing in the San Juan Islands with our daughter when she was little, and enjoyed our sleeping quarters on removable slats under the cabin top!

  • Mack the Boat
    Year Built: c. 1950
    LOA: 14'
    Beam: 4'
    Owner: Mike and Cara Loriz
    Designer: Chris-Craft kit
    Design: Fishing Skiff
    Type: outboard skiff

    In October 2017, we found this boat outside Portland, where it was almost turned into a yard planter according to the previous owner. Although without papers, Mack (as we christened the restored boat) was believed by the previous owner to be a kit boat sold by the Chris-Craft company in 1950/51 as a low cost option for returning WW II GIs. It is constructed of taped 1/2″ Douglas Fir plywood. Mack was in dreadful cosmetic shape, but quite sound structurally. The original builder is unknown. We spent the winter of 2017/18 sheathing Mack with Dynel and otherwise overhauling the entire boat. Mack is in local service to us and friends as a crabbing and fair-weather fishing boat. Mack’s regular digs is slip 63 at PT Marina.

  • Malle
    Year Built: 1936
    LOA: 23'
    Beam: 8'
    Owner: David Flaxer
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Spidsgatter
    Type: Sloop

    Malle is a spidsgatter, 30 square meter class, built in Denmark in 1936. Last year a major repair of the backbone was performed at the Wooden Boat Foundation’s boatshop. Recent improvements include conversion to an ELCO electric propulsion system.

  • Marianita
    Year Built: 2015
    LOA: 27'
    Beam: 6'8"
    Owner: Stephen Borgstrom
    Designer: Iain Oughtred
    Design: Eun Mara
    Type: Yawl

    Marianita was built over the course of 3 years in my small boat shop (it used to be a 2 car garage). She is moored in Eagle Harbor on Bainbridge Island and is a great little single-handed boat for those summer days when the chore list is done and nobody is around to act as crew. Down below there is a small galley space to port with navigation/library to starboard. Pivoting bilgeboards are built into the faces of the v-berths, this avoids having a centerboard trunk taking up space in the middle of the cabin.

  • Min Dejlige Pika
    Year Built: 2017
    LOA: 26'
    Beam: 6'4"
    Owner: Daren Lindley
    Designer: Iain Oughtred
    Design: Caledonia Yawl
    Type: Yawl

    Caledonia Yawl 19′ 10″ long with a 6’4″ beam designed by Iain Oughtred. After sailing in his uncle’s homebuilt trimaran, Daren Lindley had a life long dream to build a boat. 50 years later, Daren and his son in law, Nick Luchterhand bought the plans and started bulding. After planking the hull we could not imagine painting her. Iain Oughtred recommeded a “Boat Sauce” of boiled linseed oil and Stockholm pine tar to finish her Philippine-mahogany planking, iroko rails and black walnut furniture. She is a capacious sailer easily carrying 10 people. Daren and Nick have camp cruised from Saint John’s in Portland to Astoria, Oregon on the Columbia and also taken multi-day cruises in Puget Sound. She took six month’s to build, launching on June 15th, 2017.

  • Miss Rebecca
    Year Built: 2000
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 9'3"
    Owner: Gary Zwissler
    Designer: Arch Davis
    Design: Jack Tar
    Type: Power

    Miss Rebecca is hull #1 of Arch Davis’s Jack Tar design. She’s built of plywood/epoxy using chine log construction. The jigs and fixtures I made to build her have been shared among builders from Washington to New York, and Great Britain to the Philippines. Her plans first appeared in National Fisherman magazine in 1992. I built her as a fishing boat but my wife and I have also cruised her throughout California, Baja, and the Salish Sea. A 10-month total refit was completed in 2017. A stable and seakindley offshore fishing boat she cruises at 16 knots with a 220 mile range.

  • Misty Dawn II
    Year Built: 2017
    LOA: 19'7"
    Beam: 6'7"
    Owner: Don Edgar
    Designer: John C. Harris
    Design: CLC PocketShip
    Type: Sloop

    Chesapeake Light Craft’s PocketShip is a small cruising sailboat meant to sail well on all points, provide dry camping for two adults, and trailer easily. PocketShip uses state-of-the art construction techniques. CLC’s PocketShip design, construction and price met my requirements. Began building Misty Dawn II in October 2016 and launched in August 2017. CLC did a great job with the kit and directions. The boat is fun to sail.

  • Mojo
    Year Built: 2015
    LOA: 18'11"
    Beam: 6'2"
    Owner: Mark Ramsby
    Designer: Bieker Boats
    Design: PT Skiff
    Type: Power

    For: Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival – Long writeup
    Built By: Mark Ramsby, Portland Oregon
    Mojo: noun; “A magic charm, talisman, or spell.”

    Mojo was a retirement project. In retirement I wanted a boat with more size and stability than my little cedar strip canoe – with power other than my own, but it had to be stingy with precious fossil fuel. I was after a boat that allowed us to explore some bigger water as well – the Lower Columbia River, Hood Canal, Puget Sound and the San Juan’s.

    Russell Brown’s Port Townsend Skiff was my choice. It is a handsome and efficient design. The hull was inspired by sailing craft: well mannered and efficient at every speed, and easily driven with a small 4 cycle, fuel injected outboard.

    Construction started in October 2014 when Russell and Ashlyn delivered the kit and proceeded through September 2015. Details were added to produce a finished boat that was specific to my tastes. The depth of the sheer clamp was increased to allow a more traditional rub rail. I re-cut all of the seat-tops in Sapele then wrapped them in 4 oz. glass for strength. Mahogany upper coamings replaced the plywood parts of the kit boat. White oak blocking was added to support fittings. The list is endless!

    I finished up the hull in late July and turned her over to pro boat painter Cody Thompson to do the Baja Blue finish. After varnishing and assembly, we launched Mojo on the Willamette River on September 2, 2015. We arrived at the 2015 Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival eight days later. We took advantage of a mild Autumn that allowed use of the boat well into October. It has been great getting to know this remarkably competent little boat!

    Mojo was featured in the April 2016 issue of “Small Boats Monthly” http://smallboatsmonthly.com and in a two part series in the newsletter of RiversWest Small Craft Center, Spring 2015 & Winter 2016. http://www.riverswest.org/newsletters.html”

  • Nevermore
    Year Built: 1981
    LOA: 52'
    Beam: 11' 6"
    Owner: Billy Wolf
    Designer: Howard Chapelle
    Design: Little Cod
    Type: Schooner

    Nevermore began her life as a dream of then young Canadian shipwright Ralph Eastland. A sensible man of frugal means, Ralph ordered a set of ship plans for $5 from the Smithsonian Institute of Howard Chapelle’s Chesapeake Bay schooner “Little Cod.” With the help of his wife Debbie, the two then set to work constructing a pole shed with a broad lofting floor on the shore of British Columbia’s Quadra Island, near the village of Herriot Bay. As a woodsman with a great sense of fine woods, Ralph went into the forests of Quadra and Vancouver island and hand selected, cut and ultimately carved the woods that would become his dream ship, Nevermore. In 1981 Nevermore was launched, and for the next 6 years Ralph and Debbie lived aboard with their two daughters. As the girls grew, it bacame evident that their family would soon outgrow the living quarters of the family schooner. Arrangements were made, and the ship passed hands in 1990 to its current owner, Billy Wolf, who brought the boat to Port Townsend in 1993 where she has remained to this day. For the past 25 years, with the propitious assistance of P.T.’s exemplar wooden boat community of great riggers, awesome sail makers, creative engineers, dazzling varnishers and wizard shipwrights Dr. Wolf has meticulously maintained and improved upon Nevermore. He and his family and friends have cruised with her many seasons up along the British Columbia coast and into and around the waters of Alaska. Nevermore looks forward to spending her next 25 years as part of the Port Townsend wooden boat fleet.

  • Nordic Folkboat
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 2018
    LOA: 26'
    Beam: 6'
    Owner: Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building, NWSWB
    Designer: Tord Sunden
    Design: Nordic Folkboat
    Type: Sloop

    This Nordic Folkboat was built by the NWSWB Large Craft Classes of 2016, 2017, and 2018.

  • Nymph of Lorne
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 1963
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 8'4"
    Owner: Jack Schoolry
    Designer: James McGruer
    Design: Lorne Class Sloop
    Type: Sloop

    Nymph was built by McGruer & Co. in Scotland in 1963. She spent her first 15 years sailing in Scotland, then sailed to BC via the Atlantic, the Canal, and Hawaii. A recent book provides details about her construction, McGruer & Co. and her 4 sisterships. She was build #606 at the McGruer family boatyard. McGruer & Co. used full-length mahogany planks with glued-wedge seams, copper-riveted to steam-bent oak frames. Her timbers and floors are Afromosia. Her Lloyds-approved construction plan characterizes her as a “100-A1 Yacht.”

    We can almost always steer using 2 fingers on the tiller. She accelerates easily, and her high ballast ratio and fine ends keep her upright and footing along in a breeze. Down below, she’s a small 28-footer. Relatively long overhangs, narrow beam, fine lines fore and aft, and ample deck space give her excellent sailing performance and seaworthiness for her size and type, at the cost of interior volume.

    The cherry galley counter to starboard and large mahogany navigation desk (with chart storage) to port have leg-room below each, so that, sitting on the engine box, food can be prepared and cooked or charts reviewed. There are comfortable settees in the main cabin, which convert to a large double berth. There’s also bookshelves, a solid-fuel cabin heater, and good ventilation and light. Up forward there’s a head, bunk, hanging locker and sail stowage, lighted by deck prisms. A smallish interior ensures that there’s always a handhold within reach for a disabled captain. Her exterior is in excellent shape from masthead to the bottom of her keel. I don’t mean that she just looks good. This is not a putty-and-paint boat. She’s strong and true to the core. Nymph was sailing again in 2010 after a 5-year restoration. We’ve been cruising several weeks per year, and weekending and daysailing as often as possible.

    For a more complete discussion, photos of her restoration, lines and sailplan drawings, and downloadable documents, books and recordings about Nymph, visit her website: www.yachtflyers.com/NYMPH”

  • Old Lace
    Year Built: 1955
    LOA: 36'
    Beam: 12'
    Owner: Demian Detweiler
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Chesapeake Sedan
    Type: Power

    Old Lace was built with a double planked mahogany hull fastened on sawn wood frames. For the past 14 years she has been under cover in Shelton, WA. Previously owned by Jeff Brady and Ben Settle, she made the trip from Olympia, WA to Port Townsend over three days stopping along the way in Gig Harbor and Kingston, WA.

  • Orion
    Year Built: 1934
    LOA: 64'
    Beam: 13'
    Owner: Deep Green Wilderness
    Designer: Olin Stephens
    Design: One-off
    Type: Yawl

    Originally named Edlu, Sparkman and Stephens design #35 has received much acclaim in her 84 years. Built in 1934 at the shipyard of the legendary Henry B. Nevins, Orion has proven many times over the speed and seaworthiness of Olin Stephens’ designs. Winning the Newport Bermuda race the year she was launched Orion went on to collect a laundry list of wins for her owner and crew. Orion did her nation proud in WWII serving in the “Hooligan Navy” or Coastal Pickett Patrol searching out German U-boats along the eastern seaboard. After the war she made her way through the canal (the Panamanian flag is still on board) to the Pacific where after extensive cruising she found a berth in California. After a racing career in Sausalito and passenger service in San Diego, she went up the coast to the Pacific Northwest to her current home port of Seattle. Here she takes young people voyaging through the Salish Sea and Along the Northwest Coast meeting the mission of Deep Green Wilderness helping the sea create change that is meaningful to the ecosystem, the community and the future. Over the winter of 2010 Orion underwent an extensive restoration and refit insuring that she will be the west coast’s premier “work yacht” for another 75 years.

  • Orn II
    Year Built: 2018
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 8'3"
    Owner: Ronald Hansen & Cordell Gott
    Designer: Renn's Tolman
    Design: Tolman Alaskan Skiff Jumbo
    Type: Power

    To save time we ordered our hull parts to be cut by West Coast Boat Works of Bend, Oregon. We asked Chuck at West Coast Boat Works to increase the stringers to 9 inches and stretch the hull panels as far as the plywood would allow. Our hull measures in at 25′ 6″. The boat surveyed at 26 feet overall which qualified her for insurance for our trip to the Bahamas.

    The boat project was started on September 1, 2015. She was launched on the first of February, 2018. On February 13th we left towing the Orn II to Florida. We launched the boat at the Indiantown Marina on the Saint Lucie Canal to start our cruise to the Abaco Islands of the Bahamas.  Cordell wanted a removable bulkhead for fishing. He chose the Yamaha 200 outboard motor for the long trips off shore.  To make the boat livable for longer periods of time, Ron built in a freezer/refer and installed a Wallas 2 burner, diesel cooking/ heater.

    Our boat was inspired by our first look at Ray and Ann’s yellow Jumbo “Bright Star”. Ann said the book, ” Tolman Alaskan Skiff” was available right over at the book store, pointing to the white building. We bought the book.

  • Osprey
    Year Built: 2018
    LOA: 28'3"
    Beam: 6'
    Owner: Glen Eppick
    Designer: traditional
    Design: Sharpie
    Type: Cat ketch

    Osprey is a sharpie built in Port Townsend by Bill and Glen Eppick. Her design is that of a New Haven sharpie which was used in the East Coast oyster fisheries around the middle of the 19th century. Osprey is the 4th complete boat built by Bill Eppick of Skye Boat Works.

    Osprey was meant to be the perfect shoal draft daysailer for cruising in Puget Sound and the Salish Sea. The sharpie was started in 2003, soon after the sale of Skye. The primary reference for offsets and scantlings is a drawing by H. Chappelle obtained from the Library of Congress. The resulting design is a traditional New Haven sharpie which at 28’ would have been called a one-man or 100-bushel boat, referencing crew size and carrying capacity. Construction went along smoothly with the stem, keelson and transom, hull structure of plywood, and she was turned over for more work. After the deck was laid, Bill found work with what turned out to be a years-long repair job, which delayed work on the sharpie. In 2015, when Glen’s work started taking him to Sequim, regular visits to Port Townsend resulted in a discussion about the sharpie. An agreement was struck and construction began again on Osprey.

    As hull structure was done, work was started on the remaining projects. The centerboard was fit and cap installed on the trunk. Rudder and tiller constructed and fit to the hull. Coaming, toe rail and wale built and installed. Douglas Fir spars, glued up a decade before, cut and shaped, two freestanding masts and two sprits. Of course paint and varnish everything as many times as you can bear. Sails are being made by Carol Hasse of Port Townsend Sails.

    As I write this, late-April, we have a bit more work to go. Another coat of pain on everything. Figure out rigging, it’s simple but we haven’t finished it yet. A bit more work on mast step and partners, a final fit. Finish cleats and gather up all the bits and pieces. Buy a sculling oar. We hope to launch by early summer.

  • OWDBS
    Year Built: Unknown
    LOA: 50'
    Beam:
    Owner: Ted Crouch
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Unknown
    Type: Other

    Dragon boating was introduced to Canada when boats were paddled during Expo 86 in Vancouver British Columbia, Canada. Six wooden dragon boats were sent from Hong Kong through the Vancouver Chinese Cultural Centre to commemorate the world exposition on transportation and communication and celebrate the 100th anniversary of the founding of Vancouver.

    That same summer, the Dragon Boat Association (DBA), was formed to host the first dragon boat festival in North America with demonstration races using the original wooden dragon boats. Three more teak boats were purchased in 1987 and six Taiwanese dragon boats made of camphor wood were added to the fleet in 2003. Following almost two decades of regular use by thousands of paddlers, the original wooden dragon boats were moved into storage in 2008 under a bridge in Vancouver, BC, Canada. For the next 7 years, the Vancouver Chinese Cultural Centre Dragon Boat Association continued to be stewards of the wooden boats. Volunteers cared for the retired fleet of 15 dragon boats, heads, tails, drums and accessories – completing repairs as required including pumping rain water and snow melt out of the boats. The bridge provided some level of protection from the elements however the future of the fleet was uncertain. In 2015, the property was designated for alternate use and the DBA was asked that boats and equipment be moved.

    The complete collection was donated in June 2015 by the Vancouver Chinese Cultural Centre Dragon Boat Association to the Shuswap Rowing and Paddling Club in Salmon Arm, British Columbia Canada. Over a period of 22 months the fleet was restored with the assistance of grants from national and provincial levels of government and significant in-kind contributions from community businesses and organizations. The restoration team members were made up of 16 unemployed workers including youth at risk who gained work experience and skill development in scraping, sanding, grinding, painting, varnishing, woodworking, and power tool operation as they brought the boats back to life. The restoration of each boat included refinishing the hull, original dragon heads and tails, seats, paddles, steering oars, and drums. Upon completion of each boat, a ceremony called Awakening the Dragon or Dotting the Eyes took place in the community. The ceremony respects the dragon spirit by drawing eyes and giving them life while blessing the boat and paddlers. Respected people and community leaders were honoured to be part of the ceremony. Each boat celebrated their maiden voyage in the fresh water of Shuswap Lake. In fair exchange for the donation, the Dragon Boat Association requested that one of the restored boats be returned to their organization.

    In November 2017, the Original Wooden Dragon Boat Society (OWDBS) was incorporated under the British Columbia Societies Act. The Society was created to provide cultural, historical and educational benefits. This includes promoting healthy and active lifestyles through use of the Original Wooden Dragon Boat fleet in communities, festivals and events throughout the Pacific Northwest and across Canada. Several individuals involved with the project since the beginning continue to serve as volunteers to lead the movement forward and develop stewardship, legacy and endowment agreements with other community organizations.

  • Pacific
    Year Built: 1970
    LOA: 50'
    Beam: 14'
    Owner: Don Macmillan
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    Pacific was built to longline for halibut in the North Pacific. She has also trolled for salmon and tuna. The halibut fishermen of B.C. regarded her as on of the best of her type.

  • Pacific Grace
    Year Built: 1999
    LOA: 140'
    Beam: 22'
    Owner: S.A.L.T.S.
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Fishing Schooner
    Type: Schooner

    Built on the lines of the SALT Society’s original Robertson II, Pacific Grace was constructed in Victoria primarily of Douglas Fir. Traditional double sawn frames measuring 9″/9″ are planked with 3 inch quarter sawn fir as is the deck. Framing for the deck is Yellow Cedar. Pacific Grace has been working with youth from all backgrounds sailing to far away ports around the Pacific including, Tahiti, Pitcairn Island, Papua New Guinea, Hiroshima and Midway Island.

  • Pacific Swift
    Year Built: 1986
    LOA: 111'
    Beam: 20' 6"
    Owner: S.A.L.T.S.
    Designer: S.A.L.T.S.
    Design: One-off
    Type: Schooner

    Built by S.A.L.T.S. Sail and Life Training Society, as a working exhibit at Expo 1986 in Vancouver, British Columbia. Planked and Decked in Douglas Fir, Yellow Cedar Beams, Trimmed with Purple Heart Cap Rails and Sole, Topped Off with Spars in Douglas Fir. The Pacific Swift has sailed over 100,000 deep-sea miles on training voyages for young trainees. Her offshore travels have taken her to Australia and Europe, to remote communities on Easter and Pitcairn Islands, and to many other unusual and far-flung ports of call. When not offshore, each years she provides 5 to 10 day sail training programs for young people along the coast of British Columbia.

  • Pacifica
    Year Built: 1947
    LOA: 51'
    Beam: 10'11"
    Owner: Douglas Jones
    Designer: Sparkman & Stephens
    Design: One-off
    Type: Yawl

    Pacifica was built by the Nevins yard in City Island New York, launched in 1947 for Avard Fuller of Fuller Brush Comp. She was designed with one of the first extruded aluminum mast in the America. Pacifica is double planked, mahogany on white cedar on White oak Frames. She was built with monel frames and deck beams around her mast (esentualy a metal cage) which substantial strengthens her and takes the rig load off the hull. Doug put a new deck on her in 2005. Other than the deck Pacifica is 90% original.

    Pacifica has sailed once to the Mediterranean Sea and four times to Hawaii, two TransPac races and two San Diego to Maui races. Pacifica has been sailing in the Pacific Northwest for the last five years. Previously she sailed out of San Diego Ca for 40 years. Doug Has owned her for tha last 23 years.

  • PassageMaker
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 2017
    LOA: 11' 6"
    Beam:
    Owner: Charles F. White
    Designer: Chesapeake Bay
    Design: PassageMaker
    Type: Sail/Row

    Boat is one of six that were built for grandchildren. Started construction of the six in 2012, with the last one still to be rigged with mast and sails. Structural modifications (ribs) were made to original design to better support fore and aft decks, metal skid plates added to skid runners and keel, and access hatch added to fore deck. Boat has main and fore sails with roller furling for fore sail. (Photo is of sister boat. Red and Black checker board hull is the one which would be displayed.)

  • Patamar
    Year Built: 1937
    LOA: 34'6"
    Beam: 8'6"
    Owner: Ken Meyer
    Designer: Jake Farrell
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    This bridgedeck cruiser was home built by a Boeing engineer for use in the Salish seas. It is cedar over oak frames with a teak cabin. Power is a Yanmar diesel. I am the 5th owner.

  • PAX
    Year Built: 1936
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 9'6"
    Owner: Kaci Cronkhite
    Designer: MSJ Hansen
    Design: Danish Spidsgatter
    Type: Sloop

    PAX is a 28′ double ender—the only Danish “45m2” spidsgatter in North America. Find her remarkable journey from 1936 Denmark to California, Canada, and Port Townsend in owner/author Kaci Cronkhite’s acclaimed book–Finding Pax. Signed copies at WBF!

  • Penguin
    Year Built: 1992
    LOA: 24'
    Beam:
    Owner: George Costakis
    Designer: George Calkins
    Design: 19' Bartender
    Type: Power

    Penguin is a 19′ Bartender which is a unique double-ended planing boat designed by George Calkins. She is one of the last hulls he built and advertised in the back of Woodenboat Magazine issue #109. She is marine plywood on mahogany frame construction. In 2005, she was restored and added the small doghouse, raised windshield and self-bailing cockpit. She is powered by a 40HP, 4-stroke, outboard placed in a motorwell.

  • Pia
    Year Built: 1938
    LOA: 26'
    Beam: 8'4"
    Owner: Ahoi Mench
    Designer: Aage Utzon
    Design: Klasse Spidsgatter
    Type: Sloop

    Pia is one of six Klasse Spidsgatters imported into Victoria by the same man in the late fifties. Four of those boats including DaCapo, Cito, Eio and Pia sail Washington waters today. I found Pia in near derelict condition in Cortez Bay, BC in 1992 and spent 19 months repairing her including a new cockpit, interior, decks, rails, rudder and tiller, skylight, companionway, forward hatch and engine mounts. Badly damaged when driven onto the spit between Smith and Minor Islands in 2010 I spent another 18 months bringing her back again. She is a beautiful design of ancient heritage and this has inspired her long life.

  • Pleiades
    Year Built: Unknown
    LOA: 21'3'
    Beam: 7'
    Owner: Kay and Peter Robinson
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Unknown
    Type: Sloop

    Pleiades was purchased by Kay Robinon in the winter of 1979. At that time she was just a hull….no decking, deck framing, or cabin. Her spars however, were included, as was a very rotten suit of sails.

    Between 1979 and 1987 Kay and her husband Peter, along with an extensive cadre of local talent completely rebuilt Pleiades with the except.ion of portions of the deadwood. That cadre included Bryan Hayes, Ed Louchard, Liza Constable, Jack Finney, Charlie Moore, Miguel Winterburn, Kurt Hansen, rish Paul,and Pete Langley. Of special note is the design work of Ed Louchard on her deck layout and cabin.

    Kay and Peter sailed Pleiades for 10 years before an extensive haulout was needed to renew through hull f ittings, ref it toe rails, and renew standing rigging and some of her running rigging. Steve Chapin contributed greatly to the success of the ’97 haulout. After another 10 years, Pleiades went through another extensive haulout beginning in February, ’07. She went back in the water at the end of June with a remodeled cockpit, new coaming drifts, and repaired transom, transom framing and

    four hood ends. The transom area work was necessitated when rot was discovered in the transom planking. The ’07 haulout was greatly assisted by Russell Brown, who lent us use of his shop and expertise, Dave Langley, who kindly loaned us his trailer, and Miguel Winterburn, whose shipwright skill and knowledge greatly facilitated the transom work.

    Pleiades’ first suit of the modern era was built by Kay in Carol Hasse and Nora Petrich’s P.T. Sails loft in 1987. Kay built a second suit i n Sean Rankins’ Northwest Sai ls loft i n 2003 with design assist from Sandy Goodall.

    Unfortunately, Pleiades’ designer and year and place of origin are unknown. The previous owner provided no significant identifying information. She has been a joy to Kay and Peter and will continue to sail the inland waters of the Pacific Northwest.

  • Providence
    Year Built: 1903
    LOA: 82'
    Beam: 17'
    Owner: Simon Fawkes
    Designer: N. Neilsen & Son
    Design: Anchor Seiner
    Type: Ketch

    Built in 1903 by N. Neilsen & Son in Denmark makes Providence the oldest working ship on the BC coast. Providence has been working the seas for over 115 years, first as an Anchor Seiner in the North Sea, she was commandeered in both World Wars (the 2nd by Germany) and served in the Danish Navy. In 1978 she was sailed by her then owner Peter Thor Watson, to BC and put back to work tramping and chartering in the Caribbean and BC waters. Providence went back into fishing as a packer for another 20 years in the 90s and now serves as a Sail Cargo and Charter vessel by current owners Simon Fawkes & Danny Robertson in the Salish Sea. Still going strong after 115 years she charms all that come aboard.

  • Rascal
    Year Built: 2013
    LOA: 11'
    Beam:
    Owner: Scott Swantner
    Designer: Russell Brown
    Design: PT SPEAR
    Type: Row

    The 11 ft PT Spear dinghy uses the modern lines of the PT Eleven nesting dinghy and the same sailing rig and foils but with a different interior geometry. The Spear is generously sized but weighs only 90 lbs. and is a pleasure to row and sail. This is a rugged and handsome dinghy that takes full advantage of modern CNC technology and carbon composites for hardware & sailing rig. The boat demonstrates wood/epoxy kit boat construction with refinement and you can see her in the WEST SYSTEM tent on the point. Sold as a kit by Port Townsend Watercraft, Port Townsend WA.

  • Red
    Year Built: 2003
    LOA: 29'1"
    Beam: 8'6"
    Owner: Todd Miller
    Designer: Todd Miller
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sloop

    Red is a multichine plywood ballasted-daggerboard sloop that I designed and built for cruising in damp and wet Northwestern and Alaskan waters. The look is inspired by an eclectic assortment: a 1930’s Gordon Monroe motor sailer, Lake Union Dreamboats and early local gill netters with their tiny dog houses. To be honest the boat was really designed around the doghouse. It gets us out of the rain and has standing headroom where you can navigate from, cook and wash dishes. With an autopilot we can steer from there as well unless it is really blowing.

    It took four years to build after about a ten year designing process, in that I am not a boat designer. I started with models that kept getting larger and more precise while at the same time I steeled myself to take on the project. Finally my son suggested that I should quit building models and build the boat. So I did. We live on Quilcene Bay and launch day became a community event with friends, family, acquaintances and complete strangers showing up to build the temporary railroad that carried RED the 300 feet from my shop to the water.

    Red displaces about 4200 pounds dry and has a modern underbody and a transom-mounted spade rudder. The daggerboard is wood and glass with an 1100 pound bulb. She does have more windage than is ideal but given that I wanted the space and headroom there are always compromises. She is powered by a 10 HP outboard in a well.

    My wife, VIviann Kuehl, and I have cruised the Salish Sea and trailered RED five times to Prince Rupert, BC, and then sailed to Alaska as far north as Glacier Bay. She sails well and is just unusual enough to always start a conversation. The story of RED’s design, building, launching and travels is featured in an article in the June 2018 issue of WoodenBoat.”

  • RIPTIDE
    Year Built: 1927
    LOA: 50'
    Beam: 11' 10"
    Owner: Peter Leenhouts
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Stock Cruiser
    Type: Power

    RIPTIDE was built in 1927 by Frank E and William J Schertzer, owners of Schertzer Brothers Boat and Machine Company, which was then located at 1115 Northlake Avenue on the north end of Lake Union near the foot of Stone Way in Seattle. Her original owners are as yet unknown. RIPTIDE is 47 feet 1-inch long with a beam of 11 feet 10-inches and a draft of four feet, six inches. She is planked in port orford cedar riveted to white oak frames over an apitong backbone with western red cedar houses. She displaces about 12 tons, relatively light for a boat this size.

    A Coast Guard documented vessel, RIPTIDE carries documentation number 226242 carved into the interior face of both port and starboard bilge stringers.

    RIPTIDE is powered by remanufactured Cummins B210 5.9 liter turbo-charged diesel of 210hp. While her top speed is over 14 knots at 2400 rpm, her cruising speed is a much more sedate 9 knots at 1500 rpm. She carries 300 gallons of diesel fuel. She is maintained and upgraded by the Port Townsend Shipwright’s Co-Op in Port Townsend WA. John Zimmer, then of Palouse Boatworks, completely recaulked her in 2015. RIPTIDE is kept painted and bright by Diane Salguero of Salguero Marine Services, while her canvas work is by Suzi Clinefelter of Mystery Bay Sails and Canvas.

    RIPTIDE’s hailing port is Port Ludlow WA. She is usually moored in Port Madison, on Bainbridge Island, WA, where she has spent nearly all of her long life.

  • Riptide
    Year Built: 1939
    LOA: 53'
    Beam: 13' 6"
    Owner: Peter Riess
    Designer: Glenville Tremaine
    Design: Motor Yacht
    Type: Power

    Elco Yachts built this 53’ Motor Yacht to serve as the flagship at the 1939 New York Boats Show. She was purchased during the show by restaurant owner Howard Johnson, who named her “DOHO”. Mr. Johnson had her delivered to Miami for the winter. Life Magazine was aboard for the trip and she was featured in a long article detailing the voyage. Mr. Johnson traded her in after losing a race. During WW II, she served as a patrol boat on the Great Lakes. In the early 1950’s, she was purchased by mobster Moe Dalitz, who first kept her in Detroit, and later moved her to Lake Mead, where she was his getaway and also served as a hospitality boat for his new hotel, the Desert Inn Resort. Later she was owned by Wilbur Clark, the owner of the Thunderbird Casino. She was moved to San Diego and then to Los Angeles. During the early ‘80’s, she was featured in 53 episodes of the TV show “Riptide”. After the shows end, she fell into disrepair in San Pedro, CA, where her present owners saw her and fell in love. They undertook an extensive five-year restoration while cruising the waters of Southern California. They moved her to Port Orchard WA in 2010 and undertook a second restoration. She is a multi-awarding winning vessel, including Peoples Choice at the Bell Harbor Wooden Boat Festival and Best Power and Mayor’s Choice at the Olympia Wooden Boat Festival, as well as Best of Show at Keels and Wheels at the Des Moines (WA) Waterland Festival.

  • Romany Rye
    Year Built: 1964
    LOA: 36'8"
    Beam: 8'8"
    Owner: David and Ruth Ross
    Designer: L. Francis Herreshoff
    Design: Diddikai
    Type: Ketch

    A sweet 36′ Herreshoff ketch. As far as we know, only 4 or 5 of this design were ever built. We have sailed and worked on it for 12 happy years.

  • Romany Rye
    Year Built: 1964
    LOA: 36'8"
    Beam: 8'8"
    Owner: David and Ruth Ross
    Designer: L. Francis Herreshoff
    Design: Diddikai
    Type: Ketch

    A sweet 36′ Herreshoff ketch. As far as we know, only 4 or 5 of this design were ever built. We have sailed and worked on it for 12 happy years.

  • S.L. Puffin
    Year Built: 1906
    LOA: 21'
    Beam: 4'
    Owner: Center for Wooden Boats, Seattle
    Designer: Truscot
    Design: Steam Launch
    Type: Steam

    Built in 1906 in St Joseph Michigan as a ‘vapor compression” powered launch as a guest boat for hotels on the Great Lakes. In 1977 Puffin renovated to her present condition after falling into disrepair near the Straights of Mackinaw.

  • Saravan
    Year Built: 1938
    LOA: 32'
    Beam: 11'
    Owner: Ladysmith Maritime Society LMS
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Unknown
    Type: Power

    Saravan was built in 1938 as a harbour tug, did wartime service in Victoria harbour during WWII.

  • Sawaya
    Year Built: 1989
    LOA: 18'
    Beam: 6'7"
    Owner: James Thompson
    Designer: Jim & Ed Barlow
    Design: Pacific Pelican
    Type: Sloop

    Sawaya is hull #3 of the Pacific Pelican class, started in the 1980’s in the San Francisco Bay Area. The father-son team of Jim & Ed Barlow designed this 15 foot lugger based on the popular 12 foot San Francisco Pelican with the blessings of the original Pelicaneer, Captain Short. Constructed of marine grade Douglas fir plywood, clear Douglas fir, and California black Walnut corner blocks under the guiding eye of the late Joe Peeso, the official builder of the Pacific Pelican prototype. Epoxy was used throughout, with the decks, rudder, centerboard, and hull wrapped with fiberglas. Sawaya was launched in 1989 with many owner/builder design enhancements, and has been participating in the Wooden Boat Festival regularly ever since.

  • Schatzi
    Year Built: 1976
    LOA: 22'7"
    Beam: 7'10"
    Owner: George Costakis
    Designer: George Calkins
    Design: 22' Bartender
    Type: Power

    A 22′ Bartender built true to George Calkins’ sea-worthy, double-end, planing design. Schatzi was built by a German merchant marine living in California. Her name means “Little Darling” which she truely is. She has wonderful, sweeping lines and proportions. Built from marine plywood and mahogany frames, and powered by a Chrysler 318 V8, she can do 27 knots. After 40 years and 5 owners, she is still going strong.

  • Scout
    Year Built: 2009
    LOA: 23'4"
    Beam: 8'
    Owner: John and Helen Carlson
    Designer: John Carlson
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    Scout started as a 20 ‘ design by owner, John Carlson and she was carefully built by Sam Devlin and launched in 2009. After 7 years of cruising, John decided to add a 4 foot section to the stern. In March of 2017 the saws came out and the transom was cut off. for the next 5 months work on the addition proceeded to completion, just in time for a repaint at Sam Devlin’s shop. We scheduled to have the outboard reinstalled and made last minute adjustments to details and equipment. Re launching was done just two weeks prior to the 2017 Wooden Boat Festival. Best compliments were that the addition wasn’t noticeable. The added length improved her lines, grace and cockpit area.

  • Sea Dream
    Year Built: 1968
    LOA: 44' 9"
    Beam: 11'
    Owner: Michael Effler & Erin Leader
    Designer: Hugh Angleman
    Design: Sea Spirit
    Type: Ketch

    We discovered Sea Dream at the Chula Vista marina in Southern California in 1992, after years of walking docks – searching for a couple’s boat to explore these beautiful Northwest waters. Sea Dream was suffering from severe neglect, but she had good bones – oak framing, mahogany planking, bronze screws and copper rivets. Hugh Angleman known as the Grande Old Man of the Pacific was famous for designing the legendary “Mutiny on the Bounty” ship for the original film, Santana for Humphry Bogart and the ocean crossing Sea Witches. Sea Dream’s traditional lines and romance of a time gone by had us hooked. Her restoration began in Port Townsend continued on Bainbridge Island and after four years out of the water was re-launched in Port Orchard.

    Since Sea Dream has been a member of our family , we have re-powered the original 20 horse Albin with a 43 horse Mercedes, installed all new electrical, radar, GPS, plumbing, stainless steel tanks, prop, shaft, hand grips, stanchion bases, new bow pulpit, spider bands, bronze step plates, stem head fitting, dead eyes, windless, winches and rigging.

    We have taken great pleasure in customizing her design without compromising quality or her classic charm and traditional values. Over the years, we have redesigned and replaced the cockpit, helm seat, binnacle, house trim, king plank, teak decks, toe and rub rails. We replaced her companion way doors and added custom stain glass, reworked her galley; new refer, stove and cabinetry – added marble counters, brass sink and fixtures. We designed and commissioned custom carved pieces, reupholstered all cushions, designed all new cabinets for the head and installed new sink, mirror and marble. Most recently we have a new suit of sails hand crafted by Port Townsend Sails.

    We at Sea Sensations have a great appreciation for the local artisans and quality craftsmanship. We would like to offer our heartfelt thanks to the many involved throughout the years.

    Please join our presentations at the Maritime Center and we welcome you aboard to celebrate Sea Dream’s 50th Birthday.

  • Segue
    Year Built: 2011
    LOA: 22'
    Beam: 9' 6"
    Owner: David Blessing
    Designer: Dudley Dix
    Design: Didi Cruise Mini
    Type: Sloop

    Segue was built by the Northwest School of Wooden Boat building and the owner took delivery of a bare hull/deck/house in 2011. There followed a year of painting and fitting out. The hull is built over 9 mm ring frames and incorporates a trunk that houses a lifting keel that has 900 pounds of lead at the bottom. The combination of the deep ballast and Segue’s considerable beam gives a very stable boat suitable for single-handing. In fact, the racing version is routinely raced by one person. Segue cruises Puget Sound out of Port Ludlow. Segue is especially quick off the wind.

  • Selkie
    Year Built: 2000
    LOA: 25'6"
    Beam: 7'6"
    Owner: James & Alice Anda-Ward
    Designer: Ed Louchard
    Design: Truant
    Type: Sloop

    A wonderful day-sailor! Sociable cruising at it’s best. The truant is a wonderful boat to sail. Port Townsend designer/boatbuilder, Ed Louchard, designed her with the changing currents and winds of the Puget Sound in mind. Built by the Northwest School of Wooden Boat building, this boat is great for day-sailing, camping, and adventuring with friends. She has a beautiful spoon bow, fantail stern, and a gaff sloop sail plan. She sails fast in light wind, accelerates quickly, and is very stable.

  • Ship of Fools
    Year Built: 1950
    LOA: 14'6"
    Beam: 4'5"
    Owner: John Matthews
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: 14-Foot Standard Fisherman
    Type: Power

    “Ship of Fools” was purchased 3 years ago to serve as a lightweight, easy to maneuver vessel to get out on the water and this boat fits the bill well. This Burchcraft “14 Foot Standard Fisherman” was built in Aberdeen, Washington back in 1950. In more recent history it has been owned by members of the Antique Outboard Motor Club and has been the perfect boat for running vintage outboards on the numerous lakes and bays in the area. This craft features a hull made of 1/4″ “Harborite” fir plywood, a plywood transom, and sports beautiful mahogany trim. The vessel recently received several repairs and upgrades which were done as one of the owner’s student projects at the Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building. The work included new plywood knees, new rear thwart, rot repair in the transom, and new transom trim.

  • Silvabans
    Year Built: 1986
    LOA: 34'
    Beam: 11'
    Owner: David Smith
    Designer: Pete Culler/Bruce Northrup
    Design: One-off
    Type: British Cutter

    Working in Britain as a shipwright, Bruce North returned to the Northwest and in collaboration with Pete Culler proceeded to build two pungy schooners and two British cutters in the 70’s and 80’s. Launched and then sailed on the Columbia river she soon was hauled and rot discovered in her planking due to leaky decks and lack of ventilation. Broken hearted the owner sold her to me in despair and vague hopes I could repair her. Like some long drawn out endeavor from hell we were incarcerated in South Park among the deserted bachelors, prostitutes, and the mentally ill to try and piece her back together. A decade later (thanks to the good people of South Park) she emerged like some dandelion out of a crack in the sidewalk to live again. Part two of her life began with our family and yearly trips to Canada and of course the Woodenboat Festival in P.T. to try and create new rewarding memories. She is such a joy to cruise on that I feel guilty we don’t take more people out with us.

  • Sir Isaac
    Year Built: 1984
    LOA: 49'
    Beam: 13'
    Owner: John and Ann Bailey
    Designer: Chuck Burns
    Design: One-off
    Type: Schooner

    We purchased Sir Isaac in 2001, seeking an offshore performance cruising boat. Although she needed considerable work, we sailed her for several years learning the boat, and then put her into our shop for restoration. Ten years later she emerged, and we are relearning her as we prepare for extensive cruising.

  • Skal til Bit
    Year Built: 2017
    LOA: 20'4"
    Beam:
    Owner: Eric Friberg
    Designer: Calkins
    Design: Bartender
    Type: Power

    Stretched 19′ launched wensday 4/24/18. All Went well. Powered by a 2 stroke 30 hp Yamaha. We forgot the GPS to check the speed but she felt quite fast with 3 adults and one child. Had a great day on the water. Left Bellingham and had a good run over to chukanut bay. Look forward to testing out a lot this summer.

    Cheers Eric Friberg

  • Skye
    Year Built: 1989
    LOA: 40'5"
    Beam: 10'8"
    Owner: James Jones
    Designer: Lyle Hess
    Design: Lyle Hess 32
    Type: Cutter

    SKYE is a Lyle Hess 32, built by William and Elaine Eppick over a period of eight years and launched at Port Townsend in 1989. SKYE has a strip-planked Port Orford cedar hull, steam-bent white oak frames, Douglas fir mast and galvanized standing rigging, parceled and served. Interior woods are walnut, mahogany and maple. SKYE spent many years sailing in the Pacific Northwest with the Eppicks, and with a later owner has sailed to Hawaii and back.

  • Suellen
    Year Built: Late 1930's
    LOA: 37'
    Beam: 10'9"
    Owner: John and Jane Lebens
    Designer: Ed Mink, Sr
    Design: bridgedeck cruiser
    Type: Power

    At the age of 67 years, M/V Suellen is a fine example of Ed Monk’s designs from the late 1930’s. She was built in West Seattle by Louis A. Hascall, a master carpenter who was a supervisor at Blanchard Boat company. Launched in 1951, she was christened by his granddaughter, Suellen. She’s cruised Pacific NW waters of Puget Sound and the Columbia River for all these years. Beginning in 2008, the current owners restored her to her original appearance and modernized all her systems. Fortunately, prior owners kept her under cover in boathouses for most of her life. Among her most notable owners was Rolf Kelp, prominent New York graphic artist and founder of the Columbia River Maritime Museum in Astoria, Oregon. The ship’s log notes William Garden, the famous Pacific NW naval architect, joined Klep for a cruise in the early 1960’s. Suellen features elegant bronze art deco stanchions, beautiful original oxide yellow roofs and decks, mostly full lengths yellow cedar planking and a solid mahogany house. The interior is well proportioned for living aboard, typical of Ed monk’s comfortable cruisers. This Monk design was one of the earliest examples of the transition from vertical lines of vessels of the early 1930’s, to cleaner, more streamlined designs of the mid-century.

  • Susan Joanne
    Year Built: 2013
    LOA: 28'
    Beam: 8'6"
    Owner: Dan & Sue Parnel
    Designer: Sam Devlin
    Design: Onyx
    Type: Sloop

    I choose Sam Devlin’s Onyx design as a maximum trailer able sailboat. I have a triple axil trailer for the Susan Joanne with the idea that we could trailer her north to the inside passage or south to Southern California. I haul the boat for the winter, and store her inside. Also, I intended to build this boat. I did build the hull before taking her back to Sam to have the hull sheathed, keel box attached, and have her rotated onto the trailer. I did some more work putting the fillets on all sides of the bulkheads before running out of time. In 2012, I took the boat back to Sam to have her completed. I am glad I did, because if I had finished her, she would look home made. Because Sam and his crew finished her the Susan Joanne looks like a custom made boat in Bristol fashion that only Sam and his crew can do. She makes a great day sailor, weekender, and extended trip boat for two. We have enjoyed sailing her in Puget Sound and the San Juans. Also, I have single handed her on day sails. She has an RV shower in the head with hot water, and a Dickerson wood stove to take the edge off on a cold morning. We have a butane single burner, but do most of our cooking on a BBQ off the transom pulpit. This keeps the heat out of the cabin in the summer. The Susan Joanne is a great all around boat.

  • Swallow
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 2005
    LOA: 29'
    Beam: 8'
    Owner: NWMC
    Designer: Smythe
    Design: One-off
    Type: Sloop

    Swallow is a custom designed and built Pocket Cruiser sailboat. — design is similar in many ways to a Flicka or Falmouth Cutter. She was built using unique custom quality imported and local woods and with high quality craftsmanship. Her hull is strip planked red cedar covered with epoxy resin fiberglass cloth, with bronze fastenings and lead ballast. Beams and framing are made of laminated mahogany, and decking is made of red cedar with fiberglass overlay and non-skid paint.

    Interior is made from maple, hawthorn, Port Orford cedar and several kinds of mahogany. Cabin lights are LED and VDC wiring and is ABYC approved. Includes a solar battery charger for longer distance cruising. Cabin has lots of storage space, a port side galley and a starboard settee. Plenty of head space and is comfortable and cozy for cruising. Will sleep 3 with 2 quarter bunks and the settee. Open cockpit has tiller steering and bench seating.

    The Swallow has sailed throughout the entire Puget Sound area since 2005, including the San Juan Islands, the Canadian Gulf Islands, Nanaimo to Desolation Sound, and from Victoria to Bamfield along the southwest side of Vancouver Island. She has been well maintained and has proven to be very seaworthy and reliable along the way. Comes with heavy duty, dual axle, galvanized trailer, outboard engine, sails, boat cover, etc. Surveys from both 2005 and 2017 available.

  • SYMRA
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 1941
    LOA: 39' 6"
    Beam: 10' 6"
    Owner: Mark Haley
    Designer: John Alden
    Design: #636
    Type: Sloop

    SYMRA was commissioned by William Larsen of Tacoma to be built at the Edison Vocational Technical School. She was launched April 26, 1941 and immediately began winning races. Purchased from Larsen’s estate in 1952 by Fred Haley she was raced extensively through the 1970’s and has been owned and maintained by the Haley family for 47 years. Originally maintained by Ed Hoppen (Eddon Boats of Gig Harbor) who was a student on her as she was being built, she has been maintained by Andy Stewart/Emerald Marine of Anacortes since the 1980’s. She has been maintained to the highest standards with continuous upgrading. Most recently: new Beta 35 diesel, new bronze Italian windlass and installation of Isotherm refrigeration.

  • The Gold Cup
    Year Built: Mid 70's
    LOA: 11' 6"
    Beam:
    Owner: Ty Karney
    Designer: Ed Karelsen
    Design: "A" Class Hydro
    Type: hydroplane

    This outboard hydroplane is a mid 70’s Ed Karelsen “A” class racer designed to run about 50mph with a 15hp vintage Mercury. Karelsen unlimited hydroplanes won the Gold Cup four years in a row 1967, 68 , 69 & 70 as the Miss Bardahl and Miss Budweiser. The outboard world speed record was set with a Karelsen hydro running 176.5 mph with Bob Wartinger driving 11/30/1989. This boat was given to me free by my neighbor due to damage and rot. It needed a new bottom and part of the top deck was missing. It was purple. Restored in the summer of 2013 taking about 4 months. Used as a lake racer and art object. Boat is displayed with cool photo of Billy Schumacher winning the 1967 Gold Cup.

  • The Sande
    Year Built: 1948
    LOA: 16'
    Beam: 5'
    Owner: Wayne Matthews
    Designer: Earl Sande
    Design: Skiff
    Type: Power

    This is a 1948 Sande cedar strip with oak ribbed skiff. The boat was built by Earl Sande of Sande Boat Works in Belfair Washington. located on Hoodcanal.

  • Tomte
    Year Built: 1946
    LOA: 50'
    Beam: 15'
    Owner: Peter Heiberg
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: One-off
    Type: Power

    Tomte was originally built in 1946 as a logging camp tender based in Seymour Inlet, BC. Most of her working life, however, was spent as a fishing vessel. She was bought by the present owners after a shoddy conversion had already been undertaken. Tomte, at that point was in near-terminally bad condition but the original reasons for the purchase remained valid- a strong, seaworthy vessel, ideally suited to the coast. So the complete rebuild was undertaken, led by Chad Gheseger of Sidney BC. So far this has included the wheelhouse, bulwarks, bat wings, aft cabin, ad infinitum. The strategy has been to re-build during the winter and enjoy the boat in the summer. So far, as well as local waters, destinations have included SE Alaska and Haida Gwaii.

  • Top Hat
    Year Built: 2018
    LOA: 25'
    Beam: 6'
    Owner: Uly Cheng
    Designer: Doug Hylan
    Design: Top Hat
    Type: Power

    This motor launch was built by the Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building Contemporary Program of 2017 and 2018.

  • Unda
    FOR SALE
    Year Built: 1949
    LOA: 39'
    Beam: 10'
    Owner: Dean & Dee Dee Gurke / Lozier
    Designer: Aage Utzon
    Design: One-off
    Type: Ketch

    Unda is a double-ended cruising ketch custom designed in 1938 by Aage Utzon. She was built after World War II and launched in 1949 by Egon Nielsen Boatyard in Nakskov, Denmark.

    She is oak framed, larch planked and copper-riveted. Her spars are made from spruce. Her cabin sides and cockpit combing are made from “book-matched” teak planks. Her interior and toe rails are made from African mahogany. She is a heavy sea kindly boat built for the North Sea. Typical of Danish construction she has an unusually large and deep cockpit. Not only is she a dry boat, it has been said that the Danes like deep a cockpit because “it is just not seemly to expose your kidneys to the weather.”

    Unda was purchased by the current owner in 2004 for $1.00 – saving her from the chainsaw, and she under went extensive structural restoration at the including: 14 planks replaced, stern stem replaced, interior mostly gutted, new decks, new engine, all wiring and plumbing replaced, new rigging, and new sails.

    This work was done primarily by the current owner with some help from friends and a shipwright.

    She was relaunched in March 2005 in time for to win her division in the Master Mariner’s Regatta in San Francisco Bay. But the cosmetic and interior restoration is on-going. Meanwhile, she has been to Mexico and back twice, cruised the Pacific Northwest, and now her home is in Mud Bay on Lopez Island.

  • Velella
    Year Built: 1979
    LOA: 34'
    Beam: 9'7
    Owner: Ryan & Autumn Helling
    Designer: Wylie
    Design: Wylie 31
    Type: Sloop

    VELELLA was launched in San Diego in 1979. She was built by her original owner, Michael Butler, as a strong and capable blue water cruiser. Butler had worked for C&B Marine in Santa Cruz, California building a larger Tom Wylie designed sistership named WILD SPIRIT. Her hull was built using cedar strip planking with two diagonal veneers on the exterior and additional veneers in way of the bilge. Her deck is two layers of mahogany plywood. Her interior planking is mostly bright finished with Herreschoff style white painted bulkheads and mahogany trim. Her cabin sides and ceiling are beautiful varnished fir. She is relatively light for her size, displacing about 8,000 pounds. Her underwater configuration is a fin keel with lead ballast and stern hung rudder with full skeg. She’s sloop rigged with a removable inner forestay for a staysail and a track for a storm trysail.

    After completion, he sailed her to the South Pacific. After a series of owners in the Pacific Northwest, she was purchased by Garth Wilcox and Wendy Hinman and sailed 34,000 miles over 7 years in the Pacific, chronicled in Wendy’s book Tightwads on the Loose. Ryan and Autumn Helling have owned and lived aboard her since 2012 and race and cruise in Pacific Northwest waters. She’s proven to be a fantastic all-around boat, winning many beer can races, comfortably circumnavigating Vancouver Island and providing a comfortable home.

  • Virginia Cary
    Year Built: 1973
    LOA: 36'
    Beam: 12'
    Owner: Jerry Bohannon
    Designer: Grand Banks
    Design: Grand Banks 36
    Type: Power

    This classic 1973 Grand Banks 36 trawler is an excellent sea boat, and very comfortable for cruising. Twin Ford Lehman diesel engines use approximately 3 gallons per hour at 8 to 9 knots. 1000 mile range. This boat has made several passages into Canadian waters, and has made 2 trips to Alaska. Virginia Cary has always been under cover, and has always been maintained properly. Outstanding boat. Present owner has had the boat for 13 years.

  • Whisper
    Year Built: 1957
    LOA: 35'
    Beam: 9' 10"
    Owner: Jerry and Sandy Rogerson
    Designer: Sparkman & Stevens
    Design: K35
    Type: Sloop

    Whisper is a Sparkman and Stevens “Pilot” series sloop. Originally sailed in Maryland and Florida, she was trucked to the Pacific Northwest and nearly abandoned. After a major rebuild between 2012 and 2015, she is now capable of sailing the Salish Sea and Puget Sound.

  • Wilbur Larch
    Year Built: 2014
    LOA: 21'
    Beam: 5'
    Owner: Andy McConkey
    Designer: Antonio Dias
    Design: Harrier
    Type: Sail and Oar

    Wilbur larch, a Harrier design by Antonio Dias, was built by me, Andy McConkey and launched in 2014. Wilbur Larch is built of glued, lapstrake plywood along with other various woods such as: Ash, Mahogany, Douglas fir, White oak, Port Orford cedar and Locust from a big old tree on Vashon Island. Meant for beach cruising and rowing and sailing, Wilbur Larch has sailed a good bit throughout the Salish sea.

  • Wind Spirit
    Year Built: 1985
    LOA: 22'
    Beam: 7' 6"
    Owner: Dan Mimmack
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: One-off
    Type: Frigate

    This pirate ship was built in 1985. She was home ported in Olympia washington for 20 years. A retired naval architect created the ship from a cold molded hull. She was modified to carry square rigged sails. The vessel is a 1/3rd scale model of Christopher Columbus’s Santa Maria. She sat for 20 years outdoors before she was completely restored by her current owner in 2010. She currently entertains children of all ages on lake Ponderay in Sandpoint Idaho.

  • Wood Duck
    Year Built: 1927
    LOA: 20' 10"
    Beam:
    Owner: Dennis Welch
    Designer: Unknown
    Design: Poulsbo
    Type: Gaff

    This hull and engine were salvaged from a berry bramble and over a period of 45 years was converted to a jaunty sail boat with an attempt to keep it looking outwardly as period piece from the 1930’s but with hidden contemporary features.